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The best qualities of a team leader on The Apprentice

The Apprentice is back on TV and already we're seeing the good, bad and ugly of team leadership.

According to research by The Social Workplace, 75% of people voluntarily leaving jobs don't quit their jobs; they quit their bosses. Leadership is crucial, as these qualities I've distilled from the show make abundantly clear.

Be aware of individual strengths and weaknesses

Every person is different. You have a wide range of skills in your team. If you want to get the best out of them, recognise what every individual brings to the table. Not only does this help use talents to their best advantage – it also shows that you understand your team and value its abilities. Put the right people in the right places and work as a well-oiled machine.

Listen to all sides to create the best result

Every person engaged in a project has a valid input into it. A good leader takes the time to listen to the opinions of her team. You never know, you may have missed a key detail somewhere along the line that the rest of your team picked up on. The best teams are open and honest with each other, not hampered by office politics.

Use your common sense

Listening is good: listening to bad ideas is dangerous. Common sense – the ability to separate potentially damaging input from creative or brilliant ideas – is one of your most valuable skills. As team leader, your role is to take a step back from every situation and view it from an end user perspective. Be clear, be firm and be focused. Your team will trust you more.

Keep goals as clear as possible

Teams can only fall in line behind clear goals. If the missions are vague, you can't expect your employees to engage and work at their best. Clear definition of steps and regular progress updates are key to maintaining engagement.

Build a bond

The Apprentice is back on TV and already we're seeing the good, bad and ugly of team leadership.

According to research by The Social Workplace, 75% of people voluntarily leaving jobs don't quit their jobs; they quit their bosses. Leadership is crucial, as these qualities I've distilled from the show make abundantly clear.

Be aware of individual strengths and weaknesses

Every person is different. You have a wide range of skills in your team. If you want to get the best out of them, recognise what every individual brings to the table. Not only does this help use talents to their best advantage – it also shows that you understand your team and value its abilities. Put the right people in the right places and work as a well-oiled machine.

Listen to all sides to create the best result

Every person engaged in a project has a valid input into it. A good leader takes the time to listen to the opinions of her team. You never know, you may have missed a key detail somewhere along the line that the rest of your team picked up on. The best teams are open and honest with each other, not hampered by office politics.

Use your common sense

Listening is good: listening to bad ideas is dangerous. Common sense – the ability to separate potentially damaging input from creative or brilliant ideas – is one of your most valuable skills. As team leader, your role is to take a step back from every situation and view it from an end user perspective. Be clear, be firm and be focused. Your team will trust you more.

Keep goals as clear as possible

Teams can only fall in line behind clear goals. If the missions are vague, you can't expect your employees to engage and work at their best. Clear definition of steps and regular progress updates are key to maintaining engagement.

Build a bond

Team building begins in the office, but it cements in away days. Statistics released in 2014 suggest companies with highly engaged employees generate 2.5x the revenue of companies that don't focus on team skills. Break away from the desks for a day, and discover new ways to make your business grow. From big, bold game like It's A Knockout to smaller icebreakers, time spent team building is never wasted.

Team building begins in the office, but it cements in away days. Statistics released in 2014 suggest companies with highly engaged employees generate 2.5x the revenue of companies that don't focus on team skills. Break away from the desks for a day, and discover new ways to make your business grow. From big, bold game like It's A Knockout to smaller icebreakers, time spent team building is never wasted.

Written by Jim Alexander

23rd Friday October 2015